Retransforming the Education System

There are certain set of moral values and traditional beliefs that are passed on from older generations to newer generations. These values and belief now however are falling short of the latest trends in the education system. We all now that change is inevitable. Based on this theory the education system also needs to undergo tremendous change so that it can cope up with the fast changing times. The old standards of reading, writing and learning have to be left behind in order to put new methodologies to use. The world today is a global village and the education system of today revolves around this thought.

The subjects whether related to academic topics or with social concerns are being talked about at international level and not at national or regional level. The schools today are not teaching the lessons of patriotism. No one wants to limit their child’s thought to the borders of a country. The teachers of today teach the lesson of unity in diversity. Instead of teaching “God bless America” teachers are emphasizing on “We are the world”. The lessons that even give a single hint of racism or traditionalism have been chucked out of the text books. The text books have lessons which are compatible with the whole world. The social issues also are related with issues like global warming and other environmental issues.

The question that arises is that is all this that is happening for the good? Are we sure that this transformation of the education system will not have any wrong results? It is high time that we the people put on our thinking caps and take hold of this situation. All the things that are happening are having a politically correct angle attached with them. The upcoming generations are becoming dumber. We are sending our children to schools to make them even dumber. The moral values are running the lowest with the youth of today.

Children find it very hard to respect their elders and children can not be blamed for this. They are not being taught that paying respect to elders is important.

The children today are more impatient and lack common sense. The only good thing that they see in the whole world is their video game console. They are free to play whenever and wherever they feel like. The interest from studies is also diminishing as there are many governments across the globe which have banned the concept of giving failing grades to children up to a particular age. This was done as a step to improve the education system but the irony of the situation is that the standard of education has fallen even lower than before because the children have stopped taking studies seriously.

Giving the children modern day education is a good thing happening around but this modern age education must take along with it the old morals, values and beliefs in order to achieve over all improvement t of the society. A perfect blend of the old and the new concepts will not only make excellent professionals but will also make good human beings.

What We Need To Do To Save The American Educational System Part Three

To bring success to the American Educational System requires a rigorous non-political and non-union in- depth study lasting two to three years. Such a study needs to be done globally, state by state, town by town, city by city, and school system by school system. There are no overnight fixes, getting rid of teachers, pouring more money into the system doesn’t solve the problems. Certainly, creating school systems within schools systems with relative little supervision compounds the issues. Standardized testing does nothing other than cost the local school systems millions and millions of dollars. Going electronic does not insure success. What then, is the real challenge?

The challenge is to identify, honestly, the specific areas of failure. To do this America must be open, to envision how it can assure a higher level of student success in its schools, and hopefully, assure their chances of becoming productive citizens. Can we, as a nation, do this? We can and we must.

We need to make sure that we do not continue to spend time on unproven experimentation, change in school organization patterns, inadequate teacher preparation, and poorly constructed teacher-evaluation tools. The avoid the pitfall of repetition, the following process is recommended.

• Prioritize that which is most important in the continuation of our culture. (What are schools supposed to do?)
• Analyze the failure of those aspects of the education system that have denied the achievement of the prioritized list. (Why don’t students learn to read and to read with comprehension?)
• Recommend solutions that are long-range with built-in cyclic re-evaluation.
• Prioritize again with emphasis on those areas within the educational community that are most important to work on.

An excellent example of the use of failure analysis comes to us from NTSB. Whenever an airplane crashes every aspect of the involved plane, pilots, ground crews, service, fuel, weather, and mechanics receive painstaking analysis. Piece by piece the parts are examined. It is this type of scrutiny the American Educational System must undergo if achievable solutions are the goal.

What is the fundamental road block to this approach? It’s our social system. As a society, we discourage this kind of painstaking examination. No one likes to be put under the microscope. No one likes to admit failure. We, as a nation, have a definite mind-set to put mistakes behind us, to move on. Move on? To what? More failures?

Norman W Wilson, PhD

Understanding the Education System to Study in New Zealand

Primary School Education

Schooling is available to children from age 5 and is compulsory from ages 6 to 16.

Primary education starts at Year 1 and continues until Year 8, with Years 7 and 8 mostly offered at either a primary or a separate intermediate school. Most schools teach in English medium, but some schools teach in the Maori medium.

Some schools in New Zealand are Kura Kaupapa Maori in which the principal language of instruction is Maori and education is based on Maori culture and values. Most Kura Kaupapa Maori caters for students from Years 1 to 8, and a few (Wharekura) cater for students up to Year 13.

Secondary School Education

Secondary education system in New Zealand covers Years 9 to 13, (during which students are generally aged 13 to 17). Most secondary students in New Zealand attend Government-funded schools, which are known variously as secondary schools, high schools, colleges or area schools.

The National Certificate of Educational Achievement (NCEA) is the national senior secondary school qualification to study in New Zealand. Students are able to achieve the NCEA at three levels via a wide range of courses and subjects, both within and beyond the traditional school. The three levels of the NCEA correspond to the final three years of secondary schooling (Years 11-13). The student must achieve 80 credits on the National Qualifications Framework, 60 at the level of the certificate and 20 others to gain an NCEA.

Tertiary Education

The tertiary education to study in New Zealand is used to describe all aspects of post-school education and training. There are 36 public tertiary education institutions, including eight universities, twenty-one institutes of technology and polytechnics, four colleges of education, three wananga (Maori tertiary education institutions). There are also 46 industry training organizations, and approximately 895 private training establishments, which include private English language schools, registered by the New Zealand Qualifications Authority. Tertiary education in New Zealand offer courses at widely different levels, from transition programmes to postgraduate study and research.

Technical and Vocational Education

Technical and Vocational Education to study in New Zealand is mainly offered at institutes of technology, polytechnics, private training establishments. Some programmes are also available in secondary schools, wananga, government training establishments, one college of education and several universities.

Higher, or Degree-level Education

Universities usually offer higher, degree-level education, but institutes of technology, polytechnics, wananga and colleges of education, and at some private training establishments also offer higher degree programmes.

Summary: School Education in New Zealand is divided into Primary and secondary education. Post school education is covered by tertiary education. Technical and Vocational Education is offered by institutes of technology, polytechnics, private training establishments. Higher education to study in New Zealand is provided by Universities and other institutes.