Understanding the Education System to Study in New Zealand

Primary School Education

Schooling is available to children from age 5 and is compulsory from ages 6 to 16.

Primary education starts at Year 1 and continues until Year 8, with Years 7 and 8 mostly offered at either a primary or a separate intermediate school. Most schools teach in English medium, but some schools teach in the Maori medium.

Some schools in New Zealand are Kura Kaupapa Maori in which the principal language of instruction is Maori and education is based on Maori culture and values. Most Kura Kaupapa Maori caters for students from Years 1 to 8, and a few (Wharekura) cater for students up to Year 13.

Secondary School Education

Secondary education system in New Zealand covers Years 9 to 13, (during which students are generally aged 13 to 17). Most secondary students in New Zealand attend Government-funded schools, which are known variously as secondary schools, high schools, colleges or area schools.

The National Certificate of Educational Achievement (NCEA) is the national senior secondary school qualification to study in New Zealand. Students are able to achieve the NCEA at three levels via a wide range of courses and subjects, both within and beyond the traditional school. The three levels of the NCEA correspond to the final three years of secondary schooling (Years 11-13). The student must achieve 80 credits on the National Qualifications Framework, 60 at the level of the certificate and 20 others to gain an NCEA.

Tertiary Education

The tertiary education to study in New Zealand is used to describe all aspects of post-school education and training. There are 36 public tertiary education institutions, including eight universities, twenty-one institutes of technology and polytechnics, four colleges of education, three wananga (Maori tertiary education institutions). There are also 46 industry training organizations, and approximately 895 private training establishments, which include private English language schools, registered by the New Zealand Qualifications Authority. Tertiary education in New Zealand offer courses at widely different levels, from transition programmes to postgraduate study and research.

Technical and Vocational Education

Technical and Vocational Education to study in New Zealand is mainly offered at institutes of technology, polytechnics, private training establishments. Some programmes are also available in secondary schools, wananga, government training establishments, one college of education and several universities.

Higher, or Degree-level Education

Universities usually offer higher, degree-level education, but institutes of technology, polytechnics, wananga and colleges of education, and at some private training establishments also offer higher degree programmes.

Summary: School Education in New Zealand is divided into Primary and secondary education. Post school education is covered by tertiary education. Technical and Vocational Education is offered by institutes of technology, polytechnics, private training establishments. Higher education to study in New Zealand is provided by Universities and other institutes.

Remove The Misplaced Focus In Our Educational System

It is the general notion of every one that children should be educated suitably and should be made to understand situations. This will help them to behave appropriately. But, in reality, every grown-up person should learn a lot from kids. Every behavior of kids has lessons embedded in them. If you learn from their behavior and in turn, guide them suitably to learn life’s lessons, they will blossom into very important people in the society. Psychologists also opine that we should prepare our children for facing the world. They should be made to understand every mood of others and how people can react in various moods.

In fact, children get parallel education at home and also from the society in which they live. Though the importance of academic education can not be questioned, the education that is offered by life itself and other human beings is much greater than the academic education they get. What is learned from life and others can never be forgotten. But, unfortunately, there seems to be a wide gap between what is taught in schools and colleges and what is learned outside these institutions. Due to the power of the “external education”, what is learned in academic institutions is relegated to the background. That is the reason we find many highly intelligent children taking to arms, becoming terrorists and indulging in Internet thefts and many other nefarious activities even after getting a good education.

This goes to prove that the educational system that is prevalent now needs a complete overhauling. When parents send their children to educational institutions, they have only one aim. Their goal is that their children should get very good qualifications, settle down in a good job, a profession or a business and earn well. They can not be faulted but chasing material success alone makes the lives of the children “empty”. Even children who sizzle throughout their academics fail to achieve success in their lives. On the contrary, we find many school drop-outs achieving huge success. So, our contention that academic education alone can help our children to achieve success is fundamentally flawed.

Our educational system should be suitably modified so that we produce good human beings who can channel pressure to their advantage and who aim to achieve bigger things like mental excellence. Our children should have the required courage, energy and conviction for refusing to hold back when situations warrant their services or presence. They should have the astuteness to manage their time judiciously so that they can contribute to the society while striving for personal achievements also. They should be mentally strong and be capable of matching the demands of life, that may be unforgiving at times.

Life is calling and these children can offer a lot to the society and this will satiate their quest for personal success as well as improvement of the society in which they live.

What We Need To Do To Save The American Educational System Part Three

To bring success to the American Educational System requires a rigorous non-political and non-union in- depth study lasting two to three years. Such a study needs to be done globally, state by state, town by town, city by city, and school system by school system. There are no overnight fixes, getting rid of teachers, pouring more money into the system doesn’t solve the problems. Certainly, creating school systems within schools systems with relative little supervision compounds the issues. Standardized testing does nothing other than cost the local school systems millions and millions of dollars. Going electronic does not insure success. What then, is the real challenge?

The challenge is to identify, honestly, the specific areas of failure. To do this America must be open, to envision how it can assure a higher level of student success in its schools, and hopefully, assure their chances of becoming productive citizens. Can we, as a nation, do this? We can and we must.

We need to make sure that we do not continue to spend time on unproven experimentation, change in school organization patterns, inadequate teacher preparation, and poorly constructed teacher-evaluation tools. The avoid the pitfall of repetition, the following process is recommended.

• Prioritize that which is most important in the continuation of our culture. (What are schools supposed to do?)
• Analyze the failure of those aspects of the education system that have denied the achievement of the prioritized list. (Why don’t students learn to read and to read with comprehension?)
• Recommend solutions that are long-range with built-in cyclic re-evaluation.
• Prioritize again with emphasis on those areas within the educational community that are most important to work on.

An excellent example of the use of failure analysis comes to us from NTSB. Whenever an airplane crashes every aspect of the involved plane, pilots, ground crews, service, fuel, weather, and mechanics receive painstaking analysis. Piece by piece the parts are examined. It is this type of scrutiny the American Educational System must undergo if achievable solutions are the goal.

What is the fundamental road block to this approach? It’s our social system. As a society, we discourage this kind of painstaking examination. No one likes to be put under the microscope. No one likes to admit failure. We, as a nation, have a definite mind-set to put mistakes behind us, to move on. Move on? To what? More failures?

Norman W Wilson, PhD